Ask me anything   noteworthy NOLA, life in academia [searching for answers almost as efficiently as they elude me], ear candy andtreats for the cornea

"The answer is a mystery. A new meta-analysis shows a severe paucity of research into interventions for people age 20 or older. Analyzing 148 studies of interventions for autism from four journals — Autism, Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders — researchers found that the average age of participants ranged from 4 to 8 years old. Only 1.7 percent of participants were aged 20 or older."
— 1 year ago

Keynote- Francessca Happé (by NationalAutisticSoc)

— 1 year ago
scinerds:

The scientist who decided what you’ll eat and whether you’ll like it
Rose Marie Pangborn has almost certainly decided what you’re going to eat today. Possibly it’ll be a soda. Maybe it will be potato chips. It could be some candy. Whatever it was, her work made it possible to understand what you’ll taste, and how much you’ll like it.
Rose Marie Valdes Pangborn was born in 1932, when food science was mostly concerned with not poisoning people. She wound her way through New Mexico State University and Iowa State University before finally teaching at UC Davis - where her academic career really took off. She directed hundreds of grad students, taught one of the university’s most work-intensive classes to many hundred more undergraduates, and published over 180 papers. The subject of all that teaching and research? You’re probably nibbling on it right now. Pangborn was one of the first sensory researchers, to precisely measure a person’s responses to the food they eat.
The idea of such researchers conjures up images of tedious and cynical focus groups for a new line of soups marketed as “home style,” or the carefully edited taste tests shown in television commercials. Although Pangborn’s kind of research is worth a lot of money to companies, Pangborn’s interest was scholarly. Despite the bad press, the subject needs scholarly analysis. No one quibbles with the idea that it’s academically important to measure when a person first consciously or unconsciously responds to light, to pain, or to sound. It should be the same to measure a person’s first response to salt, or to sweet. If anything, as Pangborn discovered, the measuring of taste is a lot more complicated than the perception of light or sound.
One of the common themes running through Pangborn’s many papers is how taste is not an absolute, but depends on many different factors. She measured how body weight related to a person’s experience of milk fats. She tested how color affects a person’s experience of sweets - people tend to prefer blue and hate yellow-green. Most of all she related how a person’s regular diet caused them to react to new foods. Did someone who habitually tasted wine perceive a new kind of wine as more or less astringent than an infrequent drinker? How did someone who was accustomed to eating fats and sweets react to lemonade and milk fat compared to someone who rarely ate them? The data she got showed how complicated biochemistry and perception can be. In one paper she describes testing how regular sodium intake affects a person’s experience of salt. When salt was added to water, high-intake people recognized it first. In tomato juice, low-intake people noticed it first. Low-intake people added less salt to their food, but didn’t generally recognize when more was added. She concluded that showing that a person noticed, or liked, salt in one solution did not guarantee a better response when adding salt across the board. (She added, a little bit testily, that they needed to develop a better process to verify the salt intake of their subjects.)
Sadly, Pangborn died in 1990, but she left behind a science - sensory analysis - that she helped shape throughout its infancy. The Association for Chemoreception Sciences, which she co-founded, and the Sensory Reception Scholarship Fund, which she established, both continue to shape the science of sensory perception. Although few people will read their research, we all undoubtedly have tasted it. 

scinerds:

The scientist who decided what you’ll eat and whether you’ll like it

Rose Marie Pangborn has almost certainly decided what you’re going to eat today. Possibly it’ll be a soda. Maybe it will be potato chips. It could be some candy. Whatever it was, her work made it possible to understand what you’ll taste, and how much you’ll like it.

Rose Marie Valdes Pangborn was born in 1932, when food science was mostly concerned with not poisoning people. She wound her way through New Mexico State University and Iowa State University before finally teaching at UC Davis - where her academic career really took off. She directed hundreds of grad students, taught one of the university’s most work-intensive classes to many hundred more undergraduates, and published over 180 papers. The subject of all that teaching and research? You’re probably nibbling on it right now. Pangborn was one of the first sensory researchers, to precisely measure a person’s responses to the food they eat.

The idea of such researchers conjures up images of tedious and cynical focus groups for a new line of soups marketed as “home style,” or the carefully edited taste tests shown in television commercials. Although Pangborn’s kind of research is worth a lot of money to companies, Pangborn’s interest was scholarly. Despite the bad press, the subject needs scholarly analysis. No one quibbles with the idea that it’s academically important to measure when a person first consciously or unconsciously responds to light, to pain, or to sound. It should be the same to measure a person’s first response to salt, or to sweet. If anything, as Pangborn discovered, the measuring of taste is a lot more complicated than the perception of light or sound.

One of the common themes running through Pangborn’s many papers is how taste is not an absolute, but depends on many different factors. She measured how body weight related to a person’s experience of milk fats. She tested how color affects a person’s experience of sweets - people tend to prefer blue and hate yellow-green. Most of all she related how a person’s regular diet caused them to react to new foods. Did someone who habitually tasted wine perceive a new kind of wine as more or less astringent than an infrequent drinker? How did someone who was accustomed to eating fats and sweets react to lemonade and milk fat compared to someone who rarely ate them? The data she got showed how complicated biochemistry and perception can be. In one paper she describes testing how regular sodium intake affects a person’s experience of salt. When salt was added to water, high-intake people recognized it first. In tomato juice, low-intake people noticed it first. Low-intake people added less salt to their food, but didn’t generally recognize when more was added. She concluded that showing that a person noticed, or liked, salt in one solution did not guarantee a better response when adding salt across the board. (She added, a little bit testily, that they needed to develop a better process to verify the salt intake of their subjects.)

Sadly, Pangborn died in 1990, but she left behind a science - sensory analysis - that she helped shape throughout its infancy. The Association for Chemoreception Sciences, which she co-founded, and the Sensory Reception Scholarship Fund, which she established, both continue to shape the science of sensory perception. Although few people will read their research, we all undoubtedly have tasted it. 

(via thescienceofreality)

— 1 year ago with 303 notes
Sheezus Talks: A Critical Roundtable →

nprmusic:

Must-read Internet. —Lars

— 1 year ago with 104 notes

dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist

Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.

(via iamastrangeloop)

— 1 year ago with 986203 notes
kqedscience:

Stunning Images of Rare Albino Hummingbird
See more photography at Discovery.

kqedscience:

Stunning Images of Rare Albino Hummingbird

See more photography at Discovery.

— 1 year ago with 753 notes

President Obama Delivers Morehouse College Commencement Address (by whitehouse)

— 1 year ago
"As Morehouse Men, many of you know what it’s like to be an outsider; know what it’s like to be marginalized; know what it’s like to feel the sting of discrimination. And that’s an experience that a lot of Americans share. Hispanic Americans know that feeling when somebody asks them where they come from or tell them to go back. Gay and lesbian Americans feel it when a stranger passes judgment on their parenting skills or the love that they share. Muslim Americans feel it when they’re stared at with suspicion because of their faith. Any woman who knows the injustice of earning less pay for doing the same work — she knows what it’s like to be on the outside looking in."
— 1 year ago